Hurricane alert: US and Canada may experience worst season in history | 26 planets

The forecasts issued by this government agency in May of each year reflect that between 17 and 25 storms may form this year, that is, with sustained wind speeds exceeding 62 kilometers per hour.

Hurricane alert. Photo: EFE

The Atlantic is expected to experience an above-average hurricane season in 2024, with as many as 13 hurricanes possible. Of that number, seven may be higher, as reported Wednesday by the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

The forecasts, issued by this government agency every May, reflect that this year a Total between 17 and 25 stormsThat is, with sustained wind speeds exceeding 62 kilometers per hour.

“Notably, the outlook for storms, hurricanes and major hurricanes is the highest forecast NOAA has issued for the month of May,” NOAA Administrator Rick Spinrad said during a press conference today.

Effects of climate change.  Photo: EFEEffects of climate change. Photo: EFE

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Worrying forecasts

The organization appreciates thisHigh activity this year The occurrence of La Niña in the Atlantic Basin is due to “a combination of factors” that tend to favor storm formation, especially “near record warm ocean temperatures in the Atlantic and the development of La Niña conditions in the Pacific.”

Likewise, the Reducing Atlantic trade winds The low wind shear will help produce a season with a higher number of hurricanes than the 14 named storms in the average season.

Effects of climate change.  Photo: EFEEffects of climate change. Photo: EFE

the It was created by meteorologists The average season, which officially runs in the Atlantic from June 1 to November 30, has seven hurricanes and three major hurricanes, the latter with maximum wind speeds of 178 km/h or more.

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“actually We watch the storms move Eric Hooks, deputy administrator of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), told residents to be proactive in the face of “increasingly difficult challenges” across the country that could bring additional risks such as tornadoes, flooding and hail. .

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) notes that as “one of the strongest El Niño events ever observed” ends, there will be a rapid transition to La Niña, which tends to reduce wind shear in the tropics, increasing warming temperatures. In the tropical Atlantic Ocean and the Caribbean Sea to encourage the development of storms.

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