Jodi Foster: “Guantanamo is inhuman, not what the United States stands for as a country”

Actress Jodi Foster stars in “The Mauritanian”, a political and judicial thriller about torture and abuse at Guantanamo Bay.

“Guantánamo is not the same as the United States as a country,” the actress and director laments in an interview with Yves. Winner of Double Oscar for Best Actress (Accused1988; s Silence of the Lambs, 1991), confronts Foster V. Mauritanian A subtle challenge as you play a lawyer who is convinced of the need to defend anyone, even if, on some occasions, her clients have committed the worst acts of terror. Taher Rahim is extraordinary (ProphetIn the flogging of a Guantánamo prisoner, Foster gives the response in this vengeful and humane film that premieres on February 12, in which Benedict Cumberbatch and Shailene Woodley appear in the strong cast, which is based on real events, and which he has eclectically directed by Kevin MacDonald (The last king of Scotland, 2006).

Da 5 Bloods: Brothers in ArmsAnd the Chicago trial 7, right Now MauritanianWhy is Hollywood today so interested in politics?

Well, there’s always been political movies, and we’ve always had that. But personally, I love character movies – I’ve never been a huge fan of political movies unless they figure out how to approach a character, which is what I think Mauritanian Get. It seems to me that this movie is closely related to what is happening now. Dorey, Nancy Hollander, is a very famous civil rights and social justice attorney who advocates for people, many of whom are deeply guilty of criminal activities. She believes that this is her mission, because she believes in the rule of law in the constitution. This is one of those cases where you understand why adherence to the rule of law is so important. Certainly, after 9/11 when the whole world was filled with revenge, fear, and anger, it was important to have a judgment as a scale to keep our order going.

His character firmly believes that everyone has the right to defense. But from a personal point of view, how do you represent people who might have done terrible things?

This greatly affected Nancy as a person and I really wanted to show that on screen. Seeing how her mission in life, a very noble one that the Constitution must defend at all costs, has also forced her to have that kind of wall around her. She must be very suspicious and suspicious, and she was not able to believe in people. This is very difficult and affects that. And see how her relationship with Muhammad Ould Salahi (Rahim) has changed her over the years. He is extremely loving, human, charming, and compassionate, and the system is not allowed to break it. It’s like a mother figure to him.

Barack Obama tried to close Guantánamo but couldn’t. What do you expect from Joe Biden in this regard?

– Guantánamo will eventually be closed because it is too expensive to maintain. This is the real reason why Guantánamo is closed, be it now or, you know, within a few years. Does not make sense. And what this movie reveals is that there should not be an American justice mechanism operating specifically outside the United States, overseas, so that we don’t have to follow any of our rules. It is inhuman: It is not what we are as a state.

You mentioned that the United States reacted with fear in the international context after 9/11. How do you get out of it? How can you overcome fear and act in a somewhat more rational way?

-That’s a good question. And I think this movie explores it. One way to do this is to look back at our past, look back, and rethink our history. We go through this truth and reconciliation process and say, “How could we have done better? Where have we spoiled us? Who left us behind and who caused us harm?” You can do these kinds of refunds because if you don’t, you will do it again and it becomes a horrible pattern. We certainly learned from our experiences with Jim Crow in the South (apartheid against blacks), the trail of tears of Native Americans (mass expulsion from their lands) or with the Japanese concentration camps (on American soil during World War II.). What this country did in these dark parts of our history … We have to go back to it and understand that we will never do it again.

“Guantanamo will eventually close because it is too expensive to maintain, and that’s why it will really be closed.”

READ  Hong Kong protesters who fled by boat are sentenced to prison in China

Sacha Woodward

"Wannabe writer. Lifelong problem solver. Gamer. Incurable web guru. Professional music lover."

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back to top