What are the effects of the solar storm that erupted in Argentina

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) of the United States announced a forecast for a geomagnetic solar storm for Saturday, October 30 at noon and is expected to have effects until Sunday, October 31, 2021. It is a phenomenon caused by the arrival of a plasma wave that was launched after the star emitted a strong solar glow on last Thursday.

According to the entity’s report, this would be a Level 3 solar storm, which equates to a “strong” event on the official intensity scale of 1 to 5.

A solar storm is a disturbance of the Earth’s magnetosphere (the outermost layer of its magnetic field) when it comes into contact with a stream of particles or material from the Sun, mainly due to coronal mass ejections.

What are its effects on Earth?

This overload of energetic particles in our atmosphere usually generates a series of satellite interferences, which May cause satellite internet and GPS systems to fail (Geolocation) such as that used by mobile devices and transportation such as aircraft.

On this occasion, being a level 3 (strong) solar storm, Noaa anticipates, in addition to the above effects, potential induced currents rushing to the surface, potentially causing electrical grid failures.

The specific entity The main affected areas will be those at latitudes greater than 50 degrees. In America, for example, this corresponds to Southern Argentina, Chile, Northern USA and Canada.

Another notable effect is the aurora borealis. They are produced by overloading energetic particles in the atmosphere, which are released in the form of electromagnetic radiation and cause amazing optical effects. The more intense the solar storm, the further away from the poles the aurora.

See also  Battlefield 6's first images have been filtered

Participate

I shared this note

Lovell Loxley

"Alcohol buff. Troublemaker. Introvert. Student. Social media lover. Web ninja. Bacon fan. Reader."

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Back to top