They make glass stronger than diamonds

Posted:

10 before 2021 23:30 GMT

Unlike other crystals, which have an ordered structure of atoms, the new material combines specific atomic and other chaotic patterns, and it is precisely this combination of order and disorder that gives it its amazing properties.

On August 5, an international group of researchers published in the scientific journal National Science Review a study in which they claim to have created the material The toughest and strongest resistance known in the world even right Now.This material is made of carbon and is similar in appearance to glass, and also has light-absorbing and semiconductor properties similar to the silicon used in photovoltaics.

According to the researchers, the new substance (called AM-III) Up to 113 GPa In the Vickers hardness test, so it is Able to scratch diamonds. For comparison, natural diamonds have a hardness of 50-70 GPa, while synthetic diamonds can reach 100 GPa.

AM-III was developed by combining fullerene molecules, which are sphere-shaped molecules of carbon. Unlike other crystals, which have an ordered structure of atoms, the new material combines specific atomic and other chaotic patterns, and it is precisely this combination of order and disorder that gives it its amazing properties.

The study asserts that “carbon is one of the most fascinating elements, due to the diversity of its structurally allotropic forms, derived from different types of bonding. Exploration of new forms of carbon has always been an eternal topic of scientific research.”

Thanks to its semiconducting properties and extremely high impedance, AM-III Can be used to build solar panels and other photovoltaic devices that are exposed to extreme conditions of temperature and pressure.

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“The emergence of this type of super-hard, super-resistant semiconductor carbon material provides excellent options for the most demanding practical applications,” the researchers say, concluding that “further experimental and theoretical exploration of carbon compounds is required.”

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