The eruption of the Cumbre Vieja volcano in the Canary Islands does not give a truce | There are already more than 300 destroyed buildings

The area affected by the lava that expels the Cumbre Vieja volcano, on the Spanish island of La Palma, in the Canary Islands, It has increased by 50 percent in the last day, and there are already 6,100 evacuees and 320 buildings destroyed. Experts estimate that the eruption could last about 55 days, or at least until November. Meanwhile, authorities are closely monitoring lava flows reaching the sea, which could cause powerful eruptions and even acid rain.

As the days go by, the situation in the areas around the volcano becomes more difficult, especially for the evacuees, including 400 tourists, They had to leave their homes.

The lava has left, which is still making its way into the sea 153 hectares buried with stones, fire and ash, According to data from the Volcanic Institute of the Canary Islands from satellite images of the Copernicus programme.

The last map provided by this emergency monitoring program shows the situation at 8.14 a.m. on Tuesday and allows you to check that if compared to the previous map, at 7:50 p.m. on the 20th, The affected area moved from 103 to 153 hectares, about 50 percent.

Smoke and ash in the Canary Islands

One of the island authorities’ concerns is the large amount of ash and smoke it creates Every day between 6,140 and 11,500 tons of sulfur dioxide (SO2) is emitted into the atmosphere, According to measurements made by the Volcanic Institute of the Canary Islands (Involcan).

sulfur dioxide is A toxic, irritating gas whose concentration for short periods is very harmful For environmental systems and for health, as it can irritate the respiratory system, cause bronchitis, asthmatic reactions, reflex spasms, respiratory arrest and bronchial congestion for asthmatics.

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outbreak until november

Scientists are trying to estimate how long it will take for the volcano to stop erupting. According to Involcan, it can ranging from 24 to 84 days, with an average of 55 days, Or what the same, it may continue to expel lava at least until November or even December.

The data came from an analysis of the historical eruptions that have occurred on the island of La Palma since its last, which occurred in It was in 1971 and lasted 24 days, which is the longest, in Tehwaya, in 1585, and it lasted for 84 days.

The scientific committee that advises the calculated crisis government 200 meters per hour is the speed at which lava travels on its way to the sea It is also estimated that soil deformation in the area near the eruption is up to 28 cm.

heat shock with the sea

The lava was initially expected to reach the sea on Monday but Lava rivers slowed down.

It’s a meeting he’s especially afraid of It can generate explosions, waves of boiling water, or even toxic clouds, According to the United States Geological Survey (USGS) page.

The lava “walks relentlessly towards the sea,” lamented the president of the Canary region, Angel Victor Torres, who described “the impotence in the face of the progress of this washing that has already robbed homes in this area designated for farming . . , and that it will continue with other homes on its way.” To the sea “.

Gorgeous gray and orange lava tongues continue to slowly descend from the volcano Destroy trees, roads and houses they find in their way, It also appears in the photos published by the authorities and neighbors.

Regional Government of the Canary Islands He issued a decision “radius of exclusion of two nautical miles” about where they were expected to land Lava flows, the stranger asked not to move into the area.

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