‘A dream come true’: SpaceX shows off its largest rocket fully installed on the launch pad (PHOTOS)

Posted:

7 before 2021 11:13 GMT

The company has recently completed the installation of powerful Raptor engines and continues preparations for its launch into space on a test flight.

SpaceX is running at a fast pace and seems every day getting closer to making the first orbital test flight of its Starship Super Heavy, its largest and most powerful rocket it promises to use in the future for Transporting large payloads to the Moon or Marsand other space missions.

“A spacecraft on an orbital launch pad,” the company wrote Friday in a tweet on Twitter with several photos showing how a giant crane completes the assembly of the massive rocket in Boca Chica, Texas (USA).

The company’s founder and CEO, Elon Musk, has also shared a series of images in which the Starship SN20 can be seen on the platform, giving the impression that Coming soon. “a dream come true”, hung Billionaire in a tweet.

musk describe it CNBC Four important elements That SpaceX was not yet complete over the next two weeks before launch: adding the final heat shield panels to the spacecraft, thermal protection for the Raptor engines, completing work on thruster storage tanks on the ground, and adding a separation boom. From the newly built launch tower.

SpaceX strives for the Starship to be completely reusable rockets, which significantly reduces their cost. The company intends to transport goods and people to the Moon, Mars and other space missions. Each vessel will be capable of carrying loads of over 100 tons and 100 passengers at a time.

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The company recently completed a file Installing 29 Raptor engines He is preparing for launch into space. The SN20 spacecraft will leave the atmosphere and return to its first orbit before attempting to gently spray it off the coast of Kauai, Hawaii, in the Pacific Ocean. Meanwhile, the Super Heavy missile will attempt to land in the Gulf of Mexico, off the coast of Boca Chica. The flight is scheduled to take just over 90 minutes.

Lovell Loxley

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